Why Is It Important To Report Accidents In The Workplace?

    Why Is It Important To Record Accidents In The Workplace?

    If you suffer an injury whilst at work, filing an accident report is essential so there is a record of the incident. When you seek compensation by making an accident at work claim, this record is of paramount importance.

    Our guide explains why it is so important to record accidents in the workplace and how some incidents must be reported by law to RIDDOR. Whether you hurt an arm, hand, or suffer a severe injury that prevents you from working, you must ensure a record of the incident has been noted in an Accident Book if there is one. We cover what needs to be recorded and how to do this if there is no Accident Book in the workplace.

    If you would like to know more about claiming compensation if you are hurt at work and would like more information on the importance of filing an accident report, please contact a member of the Legal Helpline team today on 0161 696 9685.

    For more information on why it is important to record an accident in the workplace, please continue reading our guide by clicking on the sections below.

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    A Guide On The Importance of Filing An Accident Report At Work

    Our guide to reporting workplace accidents provides information on why it is important to do so, and why some accidents at work and injuries must by law be reported to RIDDOR – Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013. A failure to do so could result in hefty fines being levied against an employer.

    Reporting an accident at work

    Reporting an accident at work

    We provide workplace accident statistics and explain why it is essential that any regulations set out by RIDDOR are followed and when it is a legal requirement to do so. Our guide also provides information on why some workplace accidents may not be recorded.

    We explain how you could be entitled to file an accident at work claim, and we offer an idea on the level of workplace injury compensation you could be awarded in general damages. Our guide explains how general damages and special damages are calculated, and we offer essential information on how a No Win No Fee lawyer could represent you when you file an accident at work claim.

    To discuss a claim and to find out more on the importance of reporting an accident in the workplace, please speak to a member of the Legal Helpline team today.

    What Are Workplace Accident Reports And Records?

    Employers in the UK are obliged to follow health and safety legislation and UK laws that protect employees and other workers. This a legal requirement that employers must abide by to ensure the safety of everyone who works for them, whether onsite or offsite. Should an employer fail to follow the law, harsh penalties could be levied against them.

    Health and safety legislation also covers how accidents at work must be reported, and the procedure which all employers must follow when someone who works for them is injured in the workplace. This includes having an Accident Book where injuries can be recorded, with some accidents and injuries having to be recorded by law.

    Other reasons why employers should keep an Accident Book includes the following:

    • It meets legal requirements as set out by health and safety legislation which includes requirements relating to Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR)

    Keeping an Accident Book also helps employers identify and mitigate any hazards that may be present in the workplace. It is of great help when it comes to staff training in protocols relating to health and safety in the workplace.

    To speak to an adviser about an accident at work and the consequences of not reporting an accident at work, please call Legal Helpline today.

    Workplace Accident Statistics

    Health and safety workplace accident statistics in the UK are as follows:

    • There were 2,446 deaths due to mesothelioma as a result of past exposure to asbestos (2018)
    • There were 111 workplace fatalities during 2019/2020
    • Nearly 700,000 workers suffered a workplace injury (Labour Force Survey)
    • Over 60,000 employees suffered workplace injuries which were reported to RIDDOR
    • £16.2 billion is the estimated cost of ill-health and injuries as a result of working conditions (figures taken for the period 2018/19)

    What Is The RIDDOR

    RIDDOR stands for the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 2013. It is a health and safety government body that places duties on employers, those in control of the workplace (the Responsible Person), as well as the self-employed. These duties include reporting specific workplace accidents deemed serious as well as work-related diseases, and dangerous occurrences which are also referred to as ‘near misses’ in the workplace.

    The following must, by law, be reported to RIDDOR:

    • Violence in the workplace
    • Gas incidents
    • Injuries in schools
    • Mental health issues
    • Occupational diseases
    • Dangerous occurrences
    • Construction incidents
    • Incidents involving children
    • Incidents on countryside visits
    • Sporting injuries
    • Fairground injuries
    • Catering and hospitality accidents

    Is There A Legal Requirement To Report An Accident In The Workplace?

    Employers, the person in charge of a workplace, or the self-employed, must by law, report serious accidents, injuries and near misses to The Health & Safety Executive which includes the following:

    • If the injury involves fractures to the skull, pelvis, or spine
    • If major bones in the arm, wrist, ankle, or leg are fractured
    • If a hand or foot is amputated
    • If a toe, finger, or thumb is lost (partially or fully)
    • Injuries to the eye, or the loss of an eye
    • Electric shock resulting in the loss of consciousness, or which requires urgent medical treatment
    • Loss of consciousness as a result of a chemical or biological hazard, or where asphyxia is an issue
    • Decompression sickness
    • A workplace injury results in hospitalisation for over 24 hours

    To find out more about the importance of reporting a workplace accident, please get in touch with a member of the Legal Helpline team today.

    Why Record Your Injury In An Accident Report Book?

    If you are injured in a workplace accident, you should record details in an Accident Book if there is one. If there is no accident report book, send a private email or letter to the person in charger detailing the incident and the injuries you sustained, keeping a copy for your own personal records.

    The sort of injuries which should be recorded are as follows:

    • Minor cuts and burns
    • Trips, slips, and falls
    • Serious work-related health issues/illnesses
    • Serious injuries
    • Serious accidents
    • Near misses

    The details to include when it comes to a workplace accident and injury are as follows:

    • Date and time of the workplace accident
    • Your name and position within the company
    • As many details as possible and this includes first-aid you were given as well as treatment received in an A&E

    Having an Accident Book in a workplace also helps identify all new and existing hazards which helps prevent future incidents where employees could be injured while carrying out work for the employer.

    For more information on claiming compensation for an injury sustained in a workplace accident, please contact a member of the Legal Helpline team.

    Common Reasons For Not Filing An Accident Report At Work

    The majority of employees report injuries and workplace accidents. However, a percentage of incidents and injuries do go unreported. The reasons for this being:

    • Fear of losing a job
    • Worried that if an accident at work is reported, the employer would not consider an employee for promotion
    • Fear of being harassed
    • The process of reporting an accident at work is made too complicated

    To speak with a Legal Helpline adviser about the importance of reporting an accident at work, please get in contact today.

    Valuing Your Settlement For An Accident In The Workplace

    Instead of including a personal injury compensation calculator, we have included a table which provides an idea on the amount of accident at work compensation you may be awarded in a successful claim.

    The figures in the table below are based on the Judicial College Guidelines and cover general damages. These are awarded to compensate claimants for their injuries. However, you would also be entitled to claim special damages for any losses and out of pocket expenses you incurred.

    severity of InjuryDetailsCompensation awarded in General Damages
    Brain Damage deemed Moderately SevereVictim may suffer a serious disability £205,580 - £264,650
    Brain Damage deemed less SevereVictim may make a good recovery but loss some functions£14,380 - £40,410
    Foot Injury deemed Very SevereVictim could suffer permanent or severe injuries, disability as well as pain and suffering£78,800 - £102,890
    Foot Injury deemed severeBoth heels fractured or significant impact on an existing injury £39,390 - £65,710
    Foot Injury deemed moderateDisplacement bone fractures in the foot, May leave victim with a deformed foot£12,900 - £23,460
    Leg Injuries deemed severeMost serious leg injuries£90,320 - £127,530
    Leg Injuries deemed moderateSeveral fractures or an uncomplicated leg fracture£26,050 - £36,790
    Leg Injuries deemed less SeriousModerate leg fractures £16,860 - £26,050

    For a more accurate idea regarding the value of your accident at work claim, please contact a member of the Legal Helpline team.

    What Damages Could I Claim?

    Compensation for a successful accident at work claim can be made up of two parts:

    • General damages for the pain, impact on your quality of life, and suffering you endured (see table above)
    • Special damages for all losses and costs you incurred both in the past and in the future.

    Special damages account for expenses incurred because of the injury, which means you must provide proof in the way of receipts and documentation relating to those losses. The sort of thing you could include in a successful accident at work claim includes the following:

    • Any medical costs – prescriptions, the cost of medical treatment/therapy/rehabilitation that is not covered under the NHS
    • Any travel costs – parking fees at a hospital or another medical facility where you are being treated. The cost of getting there and back can also be claimed
    • Care costs – for help around the home during the time it takes you to recover
    • Loss of any earnings while you are off work recovering
    • Loss of future earnings if you cannot work again
    • Any other expenditure you incurred that is linked to the injury sustained in an accident at work

    To speak to a Legal Helpline adviser about special damages, please get in contact today.

    No Win No Fee Damages Claims For Accidents In The Workplace

    At Legal Helpline we provide people who have valid claims with No Win No Fee terms. This means that a solicitor from our panel would not ask you to pay any fees whether upfront or ongoing.

    The only time you pay a No Win No Fee lawyer is when you receive compensation for an injury sustained in the workplace. If your accident at work claim is not successful, you would not have to pay the solicitor any fees because they signed a No Win No Fee Agreement with you.

    For more information on how Conditional Fee Agreements work, please contact a member of our Legal Helpline team today.

    Contacting The Legal Helpline Team

    You’ve reached the end of our guide on the importance of filing an accident report at work.

    There are several ways to contact a member of the Legal Helpline team if you are ready to begin an accident at work claim, or you would like to discuss the importance of reporting an accident in the workplace. These are as follows:

    Supporting Resources

    Thank you for reading our guide on the importance of filing an accident report at work. Below, we’ve included some other guides you may find useful.

    The link below provides lots of answers to frequently asked questions relating to compensation awarded in personal injury claims relating to wheat allergies:

    Frequently asked questions

    There are time limits associated with personal injury claims which must be respected. For more information please follow the link below:

    Time limits personal injury claims

    A guide on carbon monoxide claims:

    How to claim for carbon monoxide poisoning

    For more information on what injuries and accidents have to be reported to the RIDDOR, please follow the link below:

    Reportable accidents and injuries

    If you would like more information on the law relating to Health and Safety in the workplace, please click on the link provided below:

    Health and Safety regulations in the workplace

     

    Guide by HD

    Edited by REG